What Next? – Judy King and David Truly on the Radio?

by Judy King 30. June 2010 20:37

western_clipart_cactus Internet Radio that is! And you can hear the interviews with me several times this week – no matter where you live.

As long as you have working speakers or headphones you can tune into the new KMEXRadio.FM and not only hear Amigo Rodrigo’s upcoming interview with me, (and an interview with Lakeside’s Tall Boy and Geography/Tourism specialist Professor David Truly) but also explore Amigo Rodrigo’s Network with news, weather and tips for travelers and expats, all broadcast in English along with a selection of classic top 40 music and select album tracks.  

Tune in to hear Amigo Rodrigo’s interview with Judy King on Thursday, July 1 at 6:10 p.m. and then listen to what David Truly has to say Friday, July 2 at 6:10 p.m. Judy has done two interviews with Amigo – the first was an introduction and in the second she unravels some of the cultural differences Mexicans and Expats experience when dealing in real estate.

Here’s How to Tune In to KMEXRadio.FM

cactus4 If you can send an email or surf the web, you can tune into KMEXRadio.FM. Really, it’s THAT easy! AND we’re making it even easier for you with this blog post. All you have to do is click on the phrase KMEXRadio.FM in this article, and you’ll find yourself at the home page. Then just click on the word LISTEN at the top of that page.

You can also go directly to KMEXRadio.FM by clicking on the link we’ve installed in the right hand column of this page – over there in the box that lists some of our favorite websites.  

Here’s More about KMEXRadio.FM

While I’ve enjoyed listening to music broadcast by the hundreds of all-music stations at Live365.com, a big gap in the lives of expats living or traveling in Mexico has been the lack of news and weather programming about Mexico, but presented in English.

cactus3 My new friend Amigo Rodrigo is saw that need, too and put his naturally melodic radio voice and years of northern US radio experience to work with KMEXRadio.FM. He bills his internet radio station as the “New Expat radio network.”

In addition to weather and news every hour during the day and night, Amigo Rodrigo (he was Randy until he and his wife bought a house in Manzanillo and joined the Expat movement to Mexico) fills the air time with classic top 40 tunes and a variety of informational programming.

I love his Spanish word of the hour feature. A native Spanish speaker clearly pronounces just one word several times, and explains the meaning. I think this hourly spot is helping my pronunciation already!

listenLiveKMEXRadio.FM programs flow on this hourly outline:

Top of the HourNews and weather from Mexico in English

:15 – Tips on Mexico (usually every-other-hour)

:30 – Spanish Word of the Hour

:35 – Mexico Weather Forecast

:45 – Tips on Mexico

And, don’t forget – at 6:10 p.m.  Thursday, July 1 you can hear my interview, and then at 6:10 p.m. Friday, listen for David Truly.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

La Rusa: A Russian Ballerina in Ajijic

by Judy King 27. June 2010 10:16

It takes a spirit of adventure, the ability to adjust and adapt and a certain lack of fear to move to a foreign country—even to Lakeside with all of its north of the border amenities—even today. Think then of what it must have been like to move here in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s when the villages of lakeside were not served by surfaced roads, when water was carried from communal wells strategically located about town and the trip from Chapala to Ajijic was made by boat.

Even more amazing is that some of Ajijic's most memorable pioneers were women who came alone, or remained here alone long past the deaths of their "men folk."

As you read the stories of the Lakeside pioneers, compare their journeys and their lives here to your own. These thoughts have given me great helpings of courage and gratitude for some time now.

Zara Alexeyewa, La Rusa (The Russian ballerina)
When travel writer Neill James came to Lakeside in 1943, the one-lane road connecting Chapala and Ajijic was so bad that a boat was the only reasonable transportation between the two tiny towns. When she reached the Ajijic shore, there were only 14 foreigners living in the village, and not many more in the larger town of Chapala, even though it had been "discovered" about 40 years earlier by European artists, dancers and authors.

Among those 14 foreign residents in Ajijic were three members of a single household—the Russian ballerina Ayenara Zara Alexeyewa, her mother and her dance partner/foster brother, Hoger Mehner. They'd arrived at Lakeside in the 1920s with gold fever. They bought the gold mine in the hills above Ajijic/Villa Nova/Rancho del Oro, hoping to fulfill their dreams to produce and present great Russian ballets here in Mexico.

It was true that the mountains had numerous veins of gold and that miners were finding gold. The community mill even quit grinding each household's daily corn for tortillas to crush rock instead, so that miners could pick the flakes of gold from the smaller rocks. But the short-lived gold rush at Lakeside ended when the miners found no heavy veins of easy-to-harvest gold. They soon realized that the work required to garner the small amounts of gold far outweighed the rewards.

(Left:) Ask local residents of a certain age if they remember "La Rusa" and they will tell of her riding her black horse, wearing her distinctive flat-crowned hat as she is shown in this painting.

This unlikely trio of residents in a miniscule Mexican town found Ajijic on a sightseeing trip after they completed a ballet performance at the Degollado Theater. They purchased a plot of lakefront land and built the home at Independencia #26, where they lived out their lives.

By the 1970's the ballerina's mother and Hoger were both dead and Zara had been in voluntary retirement for over 40 years. Then she decided to return to the stage once more. Unfortunately, Zara was not known for decisions based on logic or reason, and the production she planned was unusual, at best. She chose 15-year-old Sergio Lasso to be her partner in a performance of two ballets, Princess of the Moon and The Red Terror.

Sergio, who still works with the Guadalajara Cultural Commission, wrote about the production for the May-June 2001 issue of a Mexican magazine, La Pirouette Danza. There, he tells of Zara's months of frantic activity as she prepared for the production. She resurrected costumes from long-packed trunks, found people to arrange publicity, hired a chorus, orchestra, and dance corps and rented the Degollado Theater.

Zara planned to feature an exploding volcano in the final scene. She imagined that the volcano would kill all of the other dancers, leaving only the octogenarian Zara and teenaged Sergio in their roles of the Princess of the Moon and Prince of the Sun. Her notes revealed that they would be protected from the volcano by their love. Zara was years beyond being able to dance, or even move reasonably well, so during the ballet, she was placed into scenes where she would move her arms with "a certain grace" and then charming, attractive Sergio, who had studied contemporary dance—not ballet—would move her to another place on stage.

 
(Left:) This painting of Zara hangs on the west wall of La Nueva Posada's restaurant  La Rusa which is named for the dancer.

Curiosity about the performance, affection for the former great star, or just plan excitement at something  to do created a demand for chartered busses to take several hundred Lakeside residents to the city for the ballerina's last hurrah. They got more than they bargained for. It was a melodramatic performance peppered with accidents, illogical moves, confusing music and themes, but it had a finale that nearly brought down the house.

When the love-discerning volcano exploded, the flames caught the stage sets and curtains on fire. Clouds of real smoke forced the delicate dancing swans off stage, much to Zara's distress, for she had planned that they would gracefully die, one by one. The fire was quickly extinguished, but the orchestra had to be evacuated due to water in the pit.

The audience, which had largely come out of curiosity or kindness to the ballerina, had been bored through much of the unusual performance, but the finale was spectacular. The ovation that followed was probably due, in part, to the stress of the fire; but for Zara, it was the crown of her triumphant career and the finale of her life as well.

By the way if you would like to know more about Zara and Hoger, when you are in the restaurant named in her honor (Restaurant La Rusa in La Nueva Posada), take a good look at the art work mounted on the walls. There you'll find portraits and photographs of the ballerina and her partner, as well some of her performance posters.

Over the years since her death, the Eager family has purchased this memorabilia from the ballerina's caretaker/gardener.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

Fiesta de San Juan Cosalá

by Judy King 23. June 2010 11:35

SJC-flowerdisplay The most traditional patron saint fiesta, the novena in San Juan Cosalá honoring San Juan Bautista is building to its annual dramatic conclusion. The celebration in this oldest of the north shore Lake Chapala villages began June 16 with the faithful parishioners gathering to the sound of bursting sky rockets early every morning to walk in a pilgrimage to the village church.

The fiesta in San Juan Cosalá is filled with some of the most devout customs seen on Lake Chapala's north shore – including a host of special Masses which attract enough participants to fill the town church to the point of bursting.

There is a special Mass with services for the sick, in another the children receive first communion. There is a Mass for the Hijos Ausentes, (those San Juan Cosalá natives who have gone to the United States or other areas to work and live) and a Mass for those members of the community who have died during the year. It’s not unusual for as many as 18 priests from nearby communities to take part in the special noontime High Mass on June 24, the fiesta's final day. One night during the fiesta (usually on a Saturday night), townspeople take shifts to keep an all-night vigil in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament in the church.

Many of the traditions exhibited here in the fiesta are more reminiscent of the old-time fiestas than those we see in other Lakeside villages. Villagers erect altars honoring San Juan Bautista in front of their homes. Even the early morning activities in San Juan Cosalá are more focused on the activities in the church than on beginning an all-day party.

Each morning the village is awakened by cojetes (skyrockets) and music so that as many people as possible can hurry to the procession's starting points at alternating ends of the village for the walk to the church reciting the rosary. The early morning service begins at 6:30 a.m. At noon, skyrockets call townspeople to the church for meditation and another recitation of the rosary.

The daily 6 p.m. procession of pilgrims to the church is accompanied by one of the local bandas and is always lead by villagers who dance in the style of the indigenous people who lived in this area long before the arrival of the Spanish. The procession begins on alternate days from the east and west ends of Calle Porfirio Díaz.

Each evening, the day’s sponsors and others in the procession carry offerings of flowers, wine, bread, food and other items to the church. One night, a year's supply of sirios (large candles) is carried in the procession and presented to the church.

SJC-allages SJC-offering SJC-float 

The daily 6 p.m. procession of pilgrims to the church is accompanied by one of the local bandas and is always lead by villagers who dance in the style of the indigenous people who lived in this area long before the arrival of the Spanish. The procession begins on alternate days from the east and west ends of Calle Porfirio Díaz.

Each evening, the day’s sponsors and others in the procession carry offerings of flowers, wine, bread, food and other items to the church. One night, a year's supply of sirios (large candles) is carried in the procession and presented to the church.

As the evening procession arrives at the church, the band goes into the church first to play "Las Mañanitas" at the altar for San Juan.

When the band leaves the church, the dancers file in to dance at the altar in honor of the patron saint. They leave and then dance in the church's front atrium after Mass.

Each day of the fiesta is organized and sponsored by individual families and by local trade unions, businesses, and employees. Those who take an active part include the brick masons and construction workers, the restaurant owners from the Piedra Barrenada area just east of town, the shop owners, the Cosalá fishing union, the chayoteros (growers of chayote, a pear-shaped squash) the owners and employees of the balnearios (hot springs), and the achioteros (makers of achiote, a spice rub for meat and fish).

SJC-dancers SJC-beheading-juan

Some years I round up a group of friends so we can go to San Juan Cosalá for the final enormous solemn procession honoring St. John the Baptist on the evening of June 24. The procession begins at the village church, moves to the west end of town, then goes east on the carretera (highway) to Calle Porfirio Díaz and then moves back west along that street  to return to the church.

The ages of the participants ranges from newborn babies to the most elderly of the community. During the procession, young girls wear their white First Communion or confirmation dresses. You'll see figures representing the animal skin-clad John the Baptist riding on carros alegóricos (elaborate floats with Biblical themes) depicting moments in his life).

Leading off the pilgrimage are dancers, a band, and the village priest. Three or four bands, elaborate floats depicting Biblical scenes, three or four other troupes of dancers, and hundreds of pilgrims jostle for space in the narrow streets.

It is easy to see the great devotion the people hold for San Juan. Their feelings are demonstrated by the enormous attendance at the last procession and in the sacrifices of some of villagers for the patron.

SJC-blindfold SJC-baby1 SJC-baby2

Each year I spot pilgrims walking on the harsh cobblestones with bare feet—in penance or in an act of thanksgiving. Some walk the whole route blindfolded, holding to the arm of a friend, as an act of blind faith in payment of a manda (a solemn petition or vow). You'll spot many of the town's tiny tots dressed in skins (or fake fur); their parents are also carrying out their manda.

SJC-velvet There are so many walking in the procession that trying to watch from the sidewalks along Calle Porfirio Díaz just isn't comfortable and getting pictures becomes nearly impossible with people spill out of the streets to fill the sidewalks.

Over the years, I've found that my favorite spot for watching the procession is along the highway near the Telmex installation at the intersection with Calle Porfirio Díaz at the east end of town. I arrive early, find a parking space just east of the turn into the village and wait in the car in the shade until I hear the procession arriving. Then I can walk along the highway a bit and set up a great spot for viewing and picture taking.

 

The procession begins about 6 p.m. on that last day, and arrives at the church in time for 7 p.m. Mass .

The castillo (set piece fireworks) in San Juan Cosalá is usually burned earlier in the evening than it is in other towns to protect it from getting wet from an evening rainy season shower. Sometimes it is set off soon after the evening Mass, especially if it looks like a storm is approaching.

There is always a paseo and music for dancing at the plaza. In one year's grand finale, six village bandas played for the serenata (serenade) and dance, until they were rained out sometime after 1 AM.

Want to know more about San Juan Cosalá?

You may enjoy reading these other articles we’ve published about Lakeside’s most traditional village, Just click on any of these three titles:


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

Horse Puppies and Other Reasons to Love Lakeside

by Judy King 22. June 2010 09:21

camino-real It’s wonderful living in a rural environment  and at Lake Chapala, spring and early summer still means the arrival of baby animals.

I think that the profusion of animals with their wobbly new offspring was one of the endearing things that increased my intense feelings of “coming home” in the middle of Mexico – especially since home had once been small-town Iowa.

In that Iowa farmhouse, I stood washing dishes while watching the little calves with their mothers on the hill in the pasture across the gravel road.

The baby pigs lived with their moms in the farrowing house for a time, and then were turned out into a large lot with the clanging automatic feeders out beside the barn. (They were less endearing when they squeezed under the fence and rooted and snacked on the tender, sprouting plants in my vegetable garden.)

Even the mama quail got into the act, parading their family of little ones across the freshly plowed and planted garden and out toward the machine shed.

goats1 goats2

It was one of my own little offspring – about 40 years ago – who coined the phrase “horse puppies.” The origin is obvious – we thought the logic brilliant.

I suppose it is a lot easier for a toddler to call all of the baby animals “puppies” than to learn the whole range of correct baby animal names: calves, colts, piglets, kids, etc.  So while we didn’t encourage baby talk, we adopted cow puppies, horse puppies, pig puppies, and goat puppies.  The family adopted the phrase – one I still catch myself using out of habit, all these years later.

horse-bathThe Horse Puppies Made Me Do It…

So was it just the appeal of farm animals – horses, cattle, goats, pigs and chickens that attracted me to a new life at Lake Chapala?

Well, the animals, small corn fields and fruit trees were certainly was part of it – but I think that was only part of the whole that caused me to fall in love so completely, so thoroughly and deeply with life here.

Daily life here at Lakeside sparked a series of warm memories – the daily scenes here reminded me of how life was in rural American back in the early 1950s.

I think the combination of the simpler way of life, the connection of the extended family. the constant attraction and stream of entertainment in the town plaza all caused me to feel so strongly that I was  “coming home” in spite of the cobblestone streets, profusion of fiercely colored tropical flowers and surrounding ring of mountains.

The Way It Was

There were a multitude of experiences that played into that feeling and into those remembered images. Some have changed little in the 20 years I’ve been here. The Mexican families walking together to church or the plaza on warm evenings continue to remind me of being “uptown” on Saturday night back when Iowa farmers didn’t yet have electric service and needed to come to town on Saturday night to buy groceries, get haircuts, and “do their trading.”

baby-vertcal I grew up in a small town; on Saturdays we parked my grandparents’ car as near as possible to the intersection of Broadway and Main so my mother, grandmother and aunt could sit in the car and “watch the people go by.”

Where did the music originate? It was always there -- Sousa marches, happy late 40s big band, and polkas – there must have been a juke box outside somewhere  on the sidewalk.

Dad and grandpa leaned against the wall between Kelly’s Jewelry store and the barber shop and shoe shine place, or sat on the hood of the car, smoking and visiting with old school friends, customers, and business contacts.

Meanwhile my uncle sold popcorn from his sidewalk gas-powered cart and I ran and played in the courthouse lawn, browsed in the dime store, and poured over the enormous display of penny candy at the Candy Kitchen next to the Ritz Theater.

The Way It Is

Have you visited the plaza in your nearest Lakeside village on Sunday nights?  Sunday in Ajijic is the old Saturday in the Midwest. So much so that a child’s allowance here is called, in Spanish, su domingo (your Sunday).

Folks of all ages still stream to the plaza, all cleaned up and with hair slicked back. Children run and play among the walkways, pelting each other with cascarones (eggshells filled with confetti). The old folks sit on benches and visit with old friends, relatives and neighbors. The teens and young marrieds either walk in the paseo (strolling around the plaza – the boys in one direction and girls in the other) or dance to the band in the plaza kiosko (bandstand). 

The ambiance and intent of these experiences are nearly the same – yet the scenes unfolded 1800 miles and a lifetime apart – reminding many of the expats who venture into the real life of central Mexico of home, and of growing up 50 or 60 years ago.

Ahh…it’s good to have come home – especially when home means I can see a horse being bathed on a sidewalk in the middle of Ajijic while her horse puppy looks on and then go to the plaza on Sunday night, sit on a bench, listen to the music and watch the people go by. 


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

Overcoming Machismo – Mexican Fathers Part 2

by Judy King 20. June 2010 14:28

For our two-day Father’s Day tribute, yesterday we took a beginning look at what many foreigners expect the Mexican Macho to be and began exploring how the concept of the Nuevo Machismo is changing attitudes, behaviors and beliefs in today’s Mexican family.  

fathers-breakfast In Walking Stars, Stories of Magic and Power, second generation Mexican American and California author Victor Villaseñor retells the lessons his then seven-year-old father learned while recovering from the nearly fatal injuries he received from the pack of dogs that protected a neighbor's property back in Mexico. As the youngest child of the family, the boy was goaded by the other children into the orchard of the neighborhood "witch" to steal peaches. While the severely injured child was recovering, his mother shared with him her ideals for the man she wanted him to become.

"I've been raising you to be a gentle man--not a lost male who destroys all he lays his hands on because he feels so left out of the joy of giving birth.

"Mijito, (my little son) you must promise me to never do such a thing without consulting me first. You've become a little man, mi hijito, and a man always needs a woman's opinion in order to round out his decisions—like the broken rocks need the river waters to smooth out their rough edges and make the rocks smooth and round and whole. Believe me, no man's decisions are complete without a woman's influence. And no woman's garden can give life without a man's participation."

 fathers-charro clip_image004
(Left) the Mexico Charro Federation upholds the tradition of the protection and preservation of home and family along with their rules and regulations for horsemanship. (Right) The San Juan Cosalá coach of the children's dance group is a powerful and positive father figure.

An Ajijic friend recently proclaimed, “These days, men and women, we’re all changing each other.”

His compadre added, "That’s right, it isn’t just a matter of men changing. The women of our generation and the next have changed, too. Now that they are working, they have had more experiences, more options, and more power than our mothers, so they demand more respect.

“That's been a little hard for us. They want us to change even faster and they are so different from our mothers and aunts and grandmothers.

"Friends have told me that when they are angry, now their wives say, "Don't you hit me, not even one time. I'll be out of here. I'll leave and I'll go to my family. If you try to come get me back, I'll report you to Derechos Humanos (the office of Human Rights).

 fathers-plaza fathers-street fathers-priests

Through television, the church, and the school, human rights and non-violent family campaigns are underway which are designed to effect even more change. The campaigns are promoting ideas and attitudes among children that will help make the next generation of men increasingly fair and just, with greater interaction with and love for their families.

When I asked an older Lakeside man if he'd seen men's attitudes changing, he said, "It's all so different now, but I like how it looks. When my children were little, men didn't take care of babies or even small children. We were macho, and we lived more separate from our families. I wish I had touched my kids more, and kissed and hugged them more. I can see with the younger men that they have a better connection to their kids.

"In my mother's generation, the women were like slaves to our fathers, and they made sure the dinner was on the table when he walked in, but it was from fear. With my generation, I think our wives did those things from love and respect, we were more like friends with our wives, and we did things together and went places. Now, my children and their wives are partners. They share in their lives and make decisions together. I like how it looks."

Not all the news about the change in Mexican families is as positive. Francisco Cervantes, an adult education teacher, is working to positively redefine the concepts of masculinity, fatherhood, and power in family relationships. His articles, talks and seminars help men by providing a new image for the macho Mexican male, yet he also is discovering some downturns in the mindset.

In a recent article, he says, "The Mexican man has exercised masculinity and paternity in an authoritative way for centuries, creating tension in married couples and the family as a whole. Men have been able to reconcile this behavior with the role of provider inside the home, but this family structure has had many negative ramifications in the well-being of their partners and children.

"Daily life in Mexico is changing considerably, to the point where men do not always play the role of the provider, and thus have fewer reasons to exercise authority. At the same time, women have become involved in the social and economic life of the country, and children too are now more independent. Frustration at the loss of their traditional role often leads men to physical and emotional mistreatment of partners or children. "

clip_image001 clip_image002
(Left) Like many other Lakeside foreigners, American singer Glenn Yarbrough (“Baby the Rain Must Fall”) interacts with kids in his Lakeside neighborhood. (Right) The little ones enjoy a ride home with dad on the family burro.

Jerry Tello is a writer, a builder and healer of communities. Tello builds pride with blocks created from the history and culture of Mexico. "In our history, we have created more elements than any other civilization. Our ancient people understood astronomy, astrology, hydroponics, chemistry, and biology so the possibilities are there," says Tello.

Tello, a Mexican-American who lectures throughout the U.S., has written extensively—publishing everything from curriculum training manuals and commissioned papers to articles in Parent Child Magazine, Early Childhood Today and Low Rider Magazine. He has been featured in Newsweek, Time, and People magazines. Recently he related his own experiences with his father:

"My father taught me that my first obligation in life is to my mother and that fatherhood for all of us is first and foremost about honoring women—our mothers, our children's mothers and all mothers."

"Sometimes the notion of machismo is mistakenly viewed as supporting authoritarian and paternalistic behavior, but in reality machismo is about being responsible and honorable and about protecting women—not abusing them.

"In our culture being bien educados (well-educated) is not about schooling so much as it is about wisdom, about knowing and doing what is right and honorable, and about accepting responsibility for the community."

We certainly raise our glass to Mexico’s Nuevo Machismo, and also to our own father, grandfathers, uncles, and to the father of our children (some of whom followed their own brand of machismo):  Fritz, Charles and M.P., Bob, Chet, Bar, Bob, George and Dean; and David  -- thanks and love to you all and to the lessons you taught us.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

About Judy King

Judy King

Hi There — Welcome to my little corner of the world. I'm Judy King and I live in the centuries-old village of Ajijic on the north shore of Lake Chapala, Mexico's largest natural lake.

I've lived here full time since 1990, and... [ more ]

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