Answers for your Moving Concerns

by Judy King 8. April 2010 23:17

Are these questions similar to your concerns as you think about living at Lake Chapala ?

  • What do I have to do to bring my dogs to Mexico?
  • What do I do about my mail?
  • Can I just have my car shipped down to Mexico while I fly in?
  • Is it safe to have drinks with ice?
  • Where can I buy equipal furniture?
  • What are my options for health insurance in Mexico?
  • Where can I find real Mexican food?
  • If you have to drink purified water, how do you manage to safely have a shower or wash the dishes?
  • What kinds of creepy crawlies do you have here?
  • Is it safe to shop in the weekly tianguis (outdoor market)?
  • Where should I go and what should I see while I’m in Mexico?
  • Financially does it make more sense to drive down here or buy a car here?
  • What are the options for TV; can I get the channels I want to watch?

  Each week since January 2002, we’ve fielded questions like these and a whole lot more during the Mexico Insights Newcomers Seminar sessions. The small groups of foreigners meet with us every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the restaurant of La Nueva Posada in Ajijic.

DCP_0004 We’re blowing our own horn today

The truth is that we tell it like it is in these information-packed three-hour sessions.

  • We sharing vital information folks need to make an educated decision about moving to Lakeside
  • We help folks find the information they need to get here less stressful
  • We explain enough to help lower the overwhelm levels for those who have just arrived.

Here’s an interesting fact

Occasionally Lakeside residents who’ve lived here for several years come to sit in one of our sessions to see what we’re presenting and how we’re doing. They’re often shocked to realize that we offer information and answers to questions and problems that they couldn’t address.

Each Session is Adjusted for the Participants

We fine tune each session to match the participants, allowing those at the meeting to choose from a list of potential topics so we can cut right to their most pressing concerns. ; nearly always we spend a great deal of the session talking about the most common concerns of folks thinking of living at Lake Chapala – part time or full time including:

  • DSC00208 Cost of Living
  • Cultural Differences
  • Money and Banking
  • Food and Drink
  • Immigration
  • Crossing the Border
  • Lakeside Climate
  • Moving your Stuff
  • Bringing your Animals
  • Cars, Driving and Insurance
  • Health Care and Insurance
  • Public Transportation
  • Renting Homes
  • Purchasing Property
  • Safety
  • Events, Holidays and Activities
  • Getting Acquainted
  • Pitfalls, Tips, and Problems

Yes, We Do Charge for the Seminar

There’s a minimal fee to attend this session -- $40 US for a couple, $25 US for a single – and that includes your coffee, a 40-page handout book, and our personalized service as your email mentor as you prepare for your move and get settled. We also invite participants to return as alumni to sit in on one more session – without charge.

kit-tamalekit-carne 

And here’s the Mexico Insights guarantee:

If we don’t answer at least three questions you didn’t know you should ask, we’ll refund your money! You can’t do much better than that!

Guess what? No one has asked for their money back, and many mention that  we’ve answered more than those three magic questions they didn’t know to ask – in the first 30 minutes. 

You Don’t Have to Reserve a Spot…But…

It’s fun for us to know when you are coming, so send us an email: info@mexico-insights.com and we’ll add you to  the list for that week. Then we’ll be looking forward to seeing you in the restaurant area of La Nueva Posada in Ajijic for your informational, fun seminar.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

Outdoor Living is Lake Chapala’s Finest Feature

by Judy King 24. March 2010 10:41

P6240573 I guess like folks anywhere, I occasionally start taking the beauty and comfort of living here for granted. Sometimes it just takes a little time with a newcomer or a visitor to remember how lucky we are to be able to have outdoor activities, all year around. .

When I watch the weather reports showing cars sliding over snow-covered roads in winter or folks sweltering in heat and humidity I’m reminded of how lucky we are to be here and I reclaim the joy of being outside – anytime I want.

Here at Lake Chapala we have the opportunity to enjoy so many activities outside—year round. I try to remember to take time each day for some quiet relaxation in my garden listening to the birds singing and checking on the progress of the plants, trees and flowers.

Take a look at some of the summer and winter outdoor activities we take for granted here in central Mexico.

  • Most fiestas, including birthday parties for the tiniest toddlers, are held outdoors in entertainment pavilions or gardens
  • My attorney’s office has an outside waiting room with a bubbling fountain and benches in a shady nook.
  • Liz mexican massageThe cocktail areas for relaxing and chatting before concerts at the Auditorium and during intermissions at the Lakeside Little Theater are outdoor. The theater has small chimineas (clay wood burning fireplaces) to create an illusion of warmth for the cooler nights; a jacket or shawl is usually enough to keep us comfortable under the stars.
  • One of the village homes I lived in had no glass in the windows that faced the courtyard. The overhang protected us from rain and we just didn't use those rooms on the coldest days.
  • Most Lakeside restaurants have outdoor seating, or areas that are under a roof but have no side walls. Dining under the sprawling rubber tree at La Nueva Posada, in the colorful gardens at Pedro's, the upper story palapa at #4 or the semi-open areas at Ajijic Tango, or the lakefront patio of La Tasca, or the intimate, center of town space at The Secret Garden  make lunch or dinner out a very special event.
  • Lectures, groups, activities, and events are held year round on the shady patio or under the roof of the kiosk at the Lake Chapala Society.
  • Wedding receptions and huge parties take place in outdoor pavilions like Ajijic's La Pista or La Huerta and Chapala’s Mama Chuy’s where breezes blow year round through shady areas.
  • Concerts are often produced outside, in town plazas, in the front atriums of local churches and in the charro rings.
  • Golfers. tennis players, and volley ball teams are on the courses and courts every day, year round. One avid golfer tells me that there are an average of five days a year when there is enough daytime rain to keep him away from his tee time.
  • Auto repair and body work is done almost always outside, as are upholstery and woodworking.
  • Every Monday in Chapala, every Tuesday in San Antonio and San Juan Cosalá, every Wednesday in Ajijic and every Thursday in Jocotepec the tianguis (open air markets) are held in the appointed village streets.
  • Older members of local families do a great deal of their socializing, even in the evenings, on the sidewalk in front of their homes. Insects are not even a reason to keep us inside.
  • The breezes are usually balmy during 11 months of our Lakeside year and then the streets come alive with street corner or wandering vendors selling tamales, steamed guasanas (green garbanzos), boiled or toasted peanuts, hot dogs, ice cream, tacos and other goodies. People here still take time to stroll, and to do some of their shopping and errands in the evenings.

Mexico Insights Outdoor Living Tips --

DSC00224With all of these activities and events, compounded by the time you’ll spend on your one terrace or patio, we spend much of our life in Mexico outside. With pleasant temperatures and sunny skies most days, foreigners may not remember that at this altitude and longitude, the sun has a great deal more power and we need to wear sunglasses and frequently apply sunscreen to protect our eyes and skin from UV damage and sunburn.

When selecting a house to rent or buy, look for a home with a covered, south-facing terrace. Your furniture will be protected from the heavy summer nighttime rains, you’ll avoid the strong, hot sun’s rays in the hottest spring months, and have the benefit of the low, southern sun in the winter. 

What about you? What do you enjoy most about outdoor living at Lake Chapala? What are you looking forward to doing here? What tips to you have about outdoor living for those exploring life here? Just click on comments below and leave us a message.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

About Judy King

Judy King

Hi There — Welcome to my little corner of the world. I'm Judy King and I live in the centuries-old village of Ajijic on the north shore of Lake Chapala, Mexico's largest natural lake.

I've lived here full time since 1990, and... [ more ]

Let's Be Social

Become friends with
Judy on Facebook,
or follow Judy on Twitter.

Log in