Temporary Site Outage Resolved

by David McLaughlin 7. November 2010 11:40

Today, Nov. 7, 2010, from approximately 2:25 PM UTC until 5:10 PM UTC, our www.Mexico-Insights.com website was not operational (8:25 AM – 11:10 AM Ajijic local time).

This was a problem at our web hosting service, and unfortunately it occurred at a point where our ‘friendly’ error page didn’t display – only an ugly error page from the web server – not very informative.

We noticed the problem a little after 9AM local, put in a trouble ticket to the web hosting service, and in due time the issue was resolved.

We’re sorry for any inconvenience.

Thanks,

David
Mexico-Insights.com

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Misc | Living at Lake Chapala


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

What Next? – Judy King and David Truly on the Radio?

by Judy King 30. June 2010 20:37

western_clipart_cactus Internet Radio that is! And you can hear the interviews with me several times this week – no matter where you live.

As long as you have working speakers or headphones you can tune into the new KMEXRadio.FM and not only hear Amigo Rodrigo’s upcoming interview with me, (and an interview with Lakeside’s Tall Boy and Geography/Tourism specialist Professor David Truly) but also explore Amigo Rodrigo’s Network with news, weather and tips for travelers and expats, all broadcast in English along with a selection of classic top 40 music and select album tracks.  

Tune in to hear Amigo Rodrigo’s interview with Judy King on Thursday, July 1 at 6:10 p.m. and then listen to what David Truly has to say Friday, July 2 at 6:10 p.m. Judy has done two interviews with Amigo – the first was an introduction and in the second she unravels some of the cultural differences Mexicans and Expats experience when dealing in real estate.

Here’s How to Tune In to KMEXRadio.FM

cactus4 If you can send an email or surf the web, you can tune into KMEXRadio.FM. Really, it’s THAT easy! AND we’re making it even easier for you with this blog post. All you have to do is click on the phrase KMEXRadio.FM in this article, and you’ll find yourself at the home page. Then just click on the word LISTEN at the top of that page.

You can also go directly to KMEXRadio.FM by clicking on the link we’ve installed in the right hand column of this page – over there in the box that lists some of our favorite websites.  

Here’s More about KMEXRadio.FM

While I’ve enjoyed listening to music broadcast by the hundreds of all-music stations at Live365.com, a big gap in the lives of expats living or traveling in Mexico has been the lack of news and weather programming about Mexico, but presented in English.

cactus3 My new friend Amigo Rodrigo is saw that need, too and put his naturally melodic radio voice and years of northern US radio experience to work with KMEXRadio.FM. He bills his internet radio station as the “New Expat radio network.”

In addition to weather and news every hour during the day and night, Amigo Rodrigo (he was Randy until he and his wife bought a house in Manzanillo and joined the Expat movement to Mexico) fills the air time with classic top 40 tunes and a variety of informational programming.

I love his Spanish word of the hour feature. A native Spanish speaker clearly pronounces just one word several times, and explains the meaning. I think this hourly spot is helping my pronunciation already!

listenLiveKMEXRadio.FM programs flow on this hourly outline:

Top of the HourNews and weather from Mexico in English

:15 – Tips on Mexico (usually every-other-hour)

:30 – Spanish Word of the Hour

:35 – Mexico Weather Forecast

:45 – Tips on Mexico

And, don’t forget – at 6:10 p.m.  Thursday, July 1 you can hear my interview, and then at 6:10 p.m. Friday, listen for David Truly.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

A Visitor’s View of Lake Chapala

by Judy King 28. May 2010 08:49

rosario 2004 009 A while back we received a letter from one of our Living at Lake Chapala subscribers with a list of the things he experienced and thoroughly enjoyed during his trip to Lake Chapala.

Here are the things Californian Charles Patton liked best on his first visit to our area.

"The Lakeside environment was enjoyable as a result of:

  • Strangers who were willing to engage me in pleasant conversation
  • Shopkeepers, bank tellers, taxi drivers, B&B personnel, and others who were actually considerate, generous, and polite
  • A noticeable absence of "mania" in the behavior of the general populous
  • Engaging a Mexican in conversation and sensing that the person was willing, and interested in communicating even though they may not have good command of the English language and in spite of the fact that I do not have good command of the Spanish language
  • Going out for a meal and lingering without feeling as if the operators of the restaurant wanted me to leave as quickly as possible so that they could seat another customer compounded by the enjoyment of good food at an extremely reasonable price
  • The absence of guilt when I would just hang out at LCS or the lake, or at a restaurant or take a nap. It was OK to rest; it was OK to savor the moment
  • Encountering other Americans and Canadians who were actually interested in having a friendly conversation and who were not consumed by materialism or evaluating others predicated on their material or financial standing
  • The presence of many artists whose works of art have their origins somewhere deep within their souls and spirits and who are so eager to share themselves with others be it for the purpose of commerce or simply the enjoyment derived from sharing their passion with another human being

"Guadalajara, on the other hand, seems to have all of the customary and usual attributes of a big city but then one does not have to spend a lot of time in Guadalajara -- other than for major shopping or occasional forays into various entertainment venues or visits to historical and cultural landmarks.

mkt-8-hamock"While I realize that Mexico is not a perfect country and that it is a country rife with poverty, and bureaucratic bungling, monopolies that can make life a little frustrating (especially for electricity or telephone service, etc.) and that recycling and waste management remain unexplored concepts, it is the culture, the people, the value system in place, the cost of living, and the natural beauty that makes the country so attractive.”

Thanks to Charles Patton for letting us share with you his views of Living at Lake Chapala. We think sometimes it's good for you to hear it what this area is like -- from someone who has just seen it with brand-new eyes.

Readers: We’d like you to share your views of what you have seen and how you feel, what you like or don’t like while visiting or living at Lake Chapala? Email me: judy@mexico-insights.com and tell us your story – we’ll be happy to share it with our world of Mexico Insights Blog readers.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

San Juan Cosalá: The Name’s Clues to the History

by Judy King 15. April 2010 09:14

How were Lake Chapala Villages Named?

sjc-dancer-with-incense When the Spanish Franciscan missionaries reached the shores of Lake Chapala they were already proficient in renaming the indigenous towns and settlements, and they had learned to select a patron saint that would resonate  with the work, location, or geographic surroundings of the people and simply attach his name to the familiar old indigenous town names.

Here at Lake Chapala, the Saints selected have close associations with water, boats, and fishing. San Antonio Tlayacapan’s Saint Anthony was from Italy, and twice took ships trying to reach Africa where he could teach and preach and die as a martyr.

Ajijic was renamed San Andrés Ajijic to honor the fisherman who left his nets to follow Jesus. One of the legends about San Francisco, the founder of the Franciscans and the patron and namesake of Chapala was said to be such a fine teacher and preacher that the fish stood up in the water to listen to him.

San Cristobal Zapotitlán on the lake’s south shore, honors Saint Christopher, the patron saint of travelers who was said to have carried the Christ Child across a river. And San Nicolás de Ibarra (and two villages named San Nicolás on the south shore are named for good old St. Nick. Legend says he is the patron of children because he rescued three kids floating in a wash tub in the sea.

sjc-child-baptist Then there is San Juan Cosalá and San Juan Tecomatlán on the lake’s north shore and another pair of villages named for St. John the Baptist on the south side of the lake. Even more fascinating are the variety of meanings of Cosalá, San Juan’s indigenous name, according to the menu from Restaurante Viva Mexico! Tia Lupita in this village of approximately 12,000 on Lake Chapala’s north shore. 

The restaurant’s colorful menu is full of photos of the mural and includes the origins of the name of this town now home to approximately 12,000, and home in ancient times to many times more.

San Juan (Saint John refers to Saint John the Baptist, patron of the community. The meaning of the name Cosala has been interpreted by many different authors. One theory is that it is derived from an indigenous name which was spelled Cuzala, Cozala, Coslan or Cuzalan.

When you break the name into the two roots: tzalan (between) and Coatl (Serpent), this place becomes place full of serpents or is place between two serpents. Some historians have suggested the name is derived from the spelling Cutzalan or Cotzalan which means between pots.

At one time the town was known as Tlateloacan, which means Place where water flows and falls – perhaps for the waterfalls on the mountainside above the village. The region also was known at one time as Quetzali, an adjective used to describe the beautiful bird – the Quetzal and means a thing that shines, is beautiful, clean and shiny, thus it could be the “in the green water or emerald water” or “place of clean water.”

On the coat of arms of the Tlaxcalla, the name Quetzalla or Cotzallan is represented with a bundle of feathers, which was a nahuatl (indigenous group of people) symbol of beauty. We can therefore hypothesize that Cosala was named as a place of great beauty or beautiful place.

I’m stuck on one of these suggestions. In spite of knowing that back in the really old days the people of San Juan cooked some of their food by suspending pots into holes in the ground so that the heat and steam from the area’s hot springs made a natural early Crock Pot (which would normally put my favorite the words about water and pottery) I’m voting for the meaning “Place Between Two Serpents.

SJC-DamageThe Place Between Two Serpents

In the years I’ve lived at Lake Chapala there have been two storms featuring amazingly powerful waterspouts which are called serpents by area residents. The first hit up above El Limon – at the extreme west end of San Juan Cosalá, covering fields of crops with boulders that washed down the mountain in a sea of mud. Two years ago a similar storm hit following 10 days of heavy rain which super-saturated the upper mountainside. That wall of mud and rock was more than six feet deep as it rushed down the mountain from the upper reaches of the Raquet Club at the eastern end of the village.

This name makes me wonder if this natural phenomena “hasn’t happened before – maybe even frequently, back in the years between 1200 A.D. and the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.  The Place Between Two Serpents…what an interesting thought.


Judy King is publisher of Mexico Insights—Living at Lake Chapala, a monthly online magazine for people interested in Mexico's Lake Chapala region, in the state of Jalisco.

Judy, a 19-year resident of Ajijic on Lake Chapala's north shore, conducts weekly newcomer's seminars and shares her expertise about Mexico in her ezine at www.mexico-insights.com, and in the "Mexico Lindo" column of the Lake Chapala Review.

Judy also is a speaker for local organizations and visiting tour groups about the Lakeside area about Mexican customs and holidays.

About Judy King

Judy King

Hi There — Welcome to my little corner of the world. I'm Judy King and I live in the centuries-old village of Ajijic on the north shore of Lake Chapala, Mexico's largest natural lake.

I've lived here full time since 1990, and... [ more ]

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