Are Who and that interchangeable?

Are Who and that interchangeable?

There are many conflicting online sources when it comes to determining whether to use “who” or “that” in a sentence. However, one rule is absolutely clear: “Who” should be used only when referring to people. “That” can be used for referring to people and objects/subjects.

Who vs which animals?

This also applies to using “who” and “whom.” If the animal has a personal relationship with the person, then use “who” or “whom.” Otherwise you must exclusively use “which” or “that.” Here’s an example that incorporates both of these rules: Personal: My horse, whom I call Steve, is my best friend.

What’s a dangling modifier in English?

A dangling modifier is a word or phrase that modifies a word not clearly stated in the sentence. A modifier describes, clarifies, or gives more detail about a concept. Having finished the assignment, Jill turned on the TV.

What is dangling modifier example?

A modifier is considered dangling when the sentence isn’t clear about what is being modified. For example, “The big” doesn’t make sense without telling what is big which leaves “big” as a dangling modifier; but, “the big dog” is a complete phrase.

What is a modifier phrase?

A modifier is a word, phrase, or clause that modifies—that is, gives information about—another word in the same sentence. For example, in the following sentence, the word “burger” is modified by the word “vegetarian”: Example: I’m going to the Saturn Café for a vegetarian burger.

How do you identify a modifier?

Modifiers are words, phrases, or clauses that add description to sentences. Typically, you will find a modifier right next to—either in front of or behind—the word it logically describes. Take the simple, one-word adjective blue.